Testosterone is produced in the

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Similar to other hormones, the onset of perimenopause and menopause cause the decline in production of testosterone (by at least 50%) in women. Again, hysterectomy with or without removal of the ovaries will cause a more significant decline in testosterone levels . Also, high levels of stress can divert the precursors for testosterone hormone production in women over to cortisol production and create a further reduction. High stress levels can also contribute to symptoms earlier in the perimenopause when a woman is in her late thirties or early forties. This means less energy, brittle hair, less bone and muscle strength, and a diminished sexual drive. A hysterectomy and some prescription drugs can also result in lower levels of testosterone for women .

Potential risks and side effects
There is very little clinical research on treating pre-menopausal women. From the small amount of research available, it seems that the androgen levels achieved by treatment, as well as side effects, are the same as those in post-menopausal women. The main untoward effects are acne and facial hair. These occur if the level of testosterone is above normal. However, some sensitive women may have these effects with a level in the normal range. Occasionally fluid retention can occur. If testosterone rises above physiological levels, an abnormal lipid profile may occur. There are no side effects to DHEA itself because there are no receptors in the body for DHEA; all side effects are from the conversion product of DHEA, which is testosterone. Women with a history of breast cancer, severe liver disease, or severe deep vein phlebitis should not take androgens, as a certain amount of testosterone will be converted to estrogen. This treatment is also contraindicated during pregnancy, since testosterones, and even its precursor DHEA, cross the placenta and may cause changes in the genitals of the fetus. Special caution should be used when treating women of childbearing age. When prescribing testosterone treatment to a woman, be sure to prescribe adequate birth control and a warning that the androgen treatment should be stopped immediately if a pregnancy might be even remotely possible, or when considering pregnancy in the near future.

Testosterone is produced in the

testosterone is produced in the

Similar to other hormones, the onset of perimenopause and menopause cause the decline in production of testosterone (by at least 50%) in women. Again, hysterectomy with or without removal of the ovaries will cause a more significant decline in testosterone levels . Also, high levels of stress can divert the precursors for testosterone hormone production in women over to cortisol production and create a further reduction. High stress levels can also contribute to symptoms earlier in the perimenopause when a woman is in her late thirties or early forties. This means less energy, brittle hair, less bone and muscle strength, and a diminished sexual drive. A hysterectomy and some prescription drugs can also result in lower levels of testosterone for women .

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