Reactions to testosterone injections

There is no doubt about it, in the world of anabolic androgenic steroids testosterone is king and in the human body itself it is an imperative hormone. Yes, there are side effects of testosterone use but they are manageable, largely preventable and often of no concern if were responsible. There is a very real risk to reward ratio that exist around exogenous testosterone use; the more we use the greater the reward but the more we use the greater the potential for negative or adverse side effects. Further and often overlooked, a healthy diet can greatly improve our odds; as cholesterol and blood pressure can be a concern we should consume diets that promote healthy levels of both.

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Analysis of serum testosterone concentrations from 117 hypogonadal men in the 84-week clinical study of Aveed indicated that serum testosterone concentrations achieved were inversely correlated with the patient's body weight. In 60 patients with pretreatment body weight of ≥ 100 kg, the mean (±SD) serum testosterone average concentration was 426 ± 104 ng/dL. A higher serum testosterone average concentration (568 ± 139 ng/dL) was observed in 57 patients weighing 65 to 100 kg. A similar trend was also observed for maximum serum testosterone concentrations.

In June, I started TRT of 200 mg/week giving myself daily SQ injections. My total T level was 156 on a scale of 280-1100 ng/dl. The results of the first 10 week cycle of therapy were life changing. I recently began my second 10 week cycle with a new vial (same brand--Watson) of T and a new box of SQ needles. During the first cycle, I had occasional very slight itching at the injection site but certainly nothing serious. Almost immediately upon beginning the second cycle, I began to have reactions to each daily injection that included a wide area of redness/warmth, extreme itching and good sized lumps under the skin. These would last for anywhere to 4 to 6 days so that I had several of them going at once. I stopped the injections and went to the prescribing clinic. All they could really come up with was the possibility that I had developed a sensitivity to the cottonseed oil. I asked them to check into the the lot number of the new vial to see if anyone else was having issues and they said there was no indication of this. I went to an allergist and he did both a skin scratch test and a skin patch test with the Test Cyp from my vial and they both came out negative; however, a subsequent test injection once again resulted in the same injection site reaction as before. Back to doctor who prescribed Axiron. It's messy, does not give me the same results and, of course, carries the risk of skin to skin transference. Since reading some posts here, I have inquired into the possibility of having a compounding pharmacy mix the T with either sesame or grapeseed oil. They are looking into that. They have suggested that I try Testopel but reading that I have done on different sites suggests that someone as low as I am would need at least 10 pellets inserted and it sounds like there is a high possibility of negative insertion issues.

Reactions to testosterone injections

reactions to testosterone injections

In June, I started TRT of 200 mg/week giving myself daily SQ injections. My total T level was 156 on a scale of 280-1100 ng/dl. The results of the first 10 week cycle of therapy were life changing. I recently began my second 10 week cycle with a new vial (same brand--Watson) of T and a new box of SQ needles. During the first cycle, I had occasional very slight itching at the injection site but certainly nothing serious. Almost immediately upon beginning the second cycle, I began to have reactions to each daily injection that included a wide area of redness/warmth, extreme itching and good sized lumps under the skin. These would last for anywhere to 4 to 6 days so that I had several of them going at once. I stopped the injections and went to the prescribing clinic. All they could really come up with was the possibility that I had developed a sensitivity to the cottonseed oil. I asked them to check into the the lot number of the new vial to see if anyone else was having issues and they said there was no indication of this. I went to an allergist and he did both a skin scratch test and a skin patch test with the Test Cyp from my vial and they both came out negative; however, a subsequent test injection once again resulted in the same injection site reaction as before. Back to doctor who prescribed Axiron. It's messy, does not give me the same results and, of course, carries the risk of skin to skin transference. Since reading some posts here, I have inquired into the possibility of having a compounding pharmacy mix the T with either sesame or grapeseed oil. They are looking into that. They have suggested that I try Testopel but reading that I have done on different sites suggests that someone as low as I am would need at least 10 pellets inserted and it sounds like there is a high possibility of negative insertion issues.

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